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ultra-orange wine…

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No, not a lecture on ‘off-wine’ – well not in an ‘orange direction’ anyway.

I expected maybe one glass from the Puligny, but fortunately it was on fire, because the 98 Beaune Grèves that I had planned to follow was corked. I open all 1990s wines with a certain (cork) trepidation as it was a terrible time for taint – easily 10%, but I reckon higher. I’ll try another of these Jadots in the next days…

Returning to the Puligny. From an auction ‘lot’ I bought a year or two ago, this is the second I’ve opened. All these have a dark colours and the first had quite a high level of oxidation on the both the cork and the wine. This one’s cork smelled fine, despite the wine almost tending to brown…

1982 Etienne Sauzet, Puligny-Montrachet
Dark orange wine – almost tending to brown, but – hmm… Bingo! A certain freshness, white chocolate, wet wool, lanolin… In the mouth a plush silkiness with gorgeous sucrosity of fruit leaching, together with the acidity, through the gaps in your teeth and over the tongue. The finish is super-wide and slowly mouth-watering and with a faint nougat in the length. Great wine!
Rebuy – No Chance

I’ve 3 more of these, and if none are as good as this – so be it – but this was brilliant. Not bad for a villages! The only other villages I’ve had at the same level were the 64 and 59 Meursaults from Nicolas Potel’s Collection Bellenum – this one sits somewhere in-between.

3 responses to “ultra-orange wine…”

  1. L-C.

    Hi Bill,
    I’m a regular reader of your red diary, but there’s sth I don’t understand: every now and then, I read a tasting note from you, like the above, that sounds actually positive (“Great wine!” sounds at least positive to me), but that finishes with a: “Rebuy – No Chance”.
    If it’s a great wine, why not buy it again?

  2. Vinifera-Mundi

    Hi Bill

    Thank you very much for having brought this wine as a “pirate bottle” on last Monday at the Chablis tasting. Could eaysily be identified as not being a Chablis, but it really was a great experience. Probably the huge difference between great vintners (producing such wines) and normal ones, often suffering from oxydation after 10 years or so.

    All the best
    JF

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