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dujac 1995 clos de la roche

dujac-1995-clos-de-la-roche

It’s fair to say that the market has moved on significantly since I bought these bottles; they were expensive even back then, but now they’ve reached a level where I’ve no interest whatsoever to chase them – but that doesn’t mean that I’m not interested in those that still I own 😉 I feel pretty proud of myself that these have rested, undisturbed, for ten years; being buried deep in the cellar always helps of-course!

1995 Dujac, Clos de la Roche
My last bottle was opened about 10 years ago, and that was a little cloudy – but this isn’t – maybe it was a very fine tannin which has since flocculated and sunk. A very spongy cork breaks into many pieces – it doesn’t smell very nice either, but fortunately the wine below seems untainted. Medium, bright colour. The first aromas are pungent stems, but very quickly this note becomes more modest and the overall impression more balanced, a little mineral and nicely complex – it’s super. Wow – this is an explosion of intensity and minerality – almost electric – very long finishing flavours too. I can see (taste) something in the mid-palate that reminds me of the smell from the cork (aldehydic) but it’s on a very low-level and because I didn’t mention it, nobody else noticed it – or at least chose to comment. The tannin is still there in spades – should you choose to search it out – but the wine is very well-balanced and drinking beautifully today – beautifully.
Rebuy – Yes

dujac-1995-clos-de-la-roche-cork

One response to “dujac 1995 clos de la roche”

  1. Claude Kolm

    Like Rousseau wines, Dujacs (at least those made when Jacques was in charge, I don’t yet have enough experience with the newer ones) hardly ever seem to go into a closed phase and so are wonderful to drink at any age. I mentioned this once to Eric Rousseau and he nodded and chuckled, noting how the two estates made their wines quite differently.

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