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offer of the day – henri boillot 2011s…

VILLAGES BLANCS 2011
BOURGOGNE Chardonnay 75cl 20.00 (Swiss francs)
MEURSAULT 75cl 39.00
PULIGNY-MONTRACHET 75cl 42.00

PREMIERS CRUS BLANCS 2010
MEURSAULT Les Genevrières 75cl 79.00 (68.00)
MEURSAULT Les Perrières 75cl 79.00 (69.00)
PULIGNY-MONTRACHET Clos de La Mouchère 75cl 72.00 (68.00)
PULIGNY-MONTRACHET Les Caillerets 75cl 75.00 (69.00)
PULIGNY-MONTRACHET Les Pucelles 75cl 78.00 (72.00)

GRANDS CRUS BLANCS 2010
CORTON CHARLEMAGNE 75cl 99.50 (98.00)
CRIOTS BÂTARD MONTRACHET 75cl 168.00 (159.00)
BIENVENUES BÂTARD MONTRACHET 75cl 189.00 (178.00)
BÂTARD MONTRACHET 75cl 249.00 (235.00)
CHEVALIER-MONTRACHET 75cl 359.00 (349.00)
MONTRACHET 75cl 448.00 (399.00)

VILLAGE & PREMIERS CRUS ROUGES 2010
VOLNAY 75cl 39.00
VOLNAY Les Caillerets 75cl 69.00 (66.00)
POMMARD Les Rugiens 75cl 69.00

GRANDS CRUS ROUGES 2010
CLOS DE VOUGEOT 75cl 105.00 (98.00)
BONNES MARES 75cl 169.00 (159.00)
CHAMBERTIN 75cl 169.00 (159.00)

2011 was certainly a vintage with modest yields, though I expect the miserly yields of 2012 will put things in a starker focus. Above are the local offer prices for 2011 with the equivalent 2010 price in brackets afterwards – no bracket, then no price change. It seems that, Rugiens excepted, only the villages wines have escaped increases.

And while we’re on the subject of buying wine, here’s a worthwhile article. Though therein, in reference to premature oxidation, I note the following quote – I wonder how they ‘control’ that then!!!

Burgundians claim that these issues have all now been addressed. The Burgundy Wine Council now controls the amount of oxygen that enters during bottling and has issued directives about how oxygen-free bottling can best be done.
Roger Voss, Wine Enthusiast Magazine [Archived]

One response to “offer of the day – henri boillot 2011s…”

  1. Eric Lundblad, owner/winemaker Ladd Cellars

    How you control the amount of oxygen in wine: buy a dissolved oxygen meter (or borrow/rent one), measure the DO (dissolved oxygen) levels in the wine at whatever intervals is deemed appropriate (by the Burgundy Wine Council?)…if the dissolved oxygen is higher than is appropriate/desired then bubble Nitrogen gas (or CO2 gas, tho it’s unlikely this makes sense in most situations) through the wine until the desired DO levels are reached (bubbling Nitrogen gas through wine reduces the DO levels…my understanding is it’s the physical agitation, and the fact that Nitrogen is inert, that causes oxygen to be released from the wine). Reviewing your topping/racking intervals/procedures, and to a lesser extent your sulfur levels, to see why your DO levels are too high probably makes sense.

Agree? Disagree? Anything you'd like to add?

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